Elbe Textiles Cornell Shirt and Style Arc Brooklyn Knit Pants

Hello friends! It’s been a long time since I posted sewing content, largely because it’s been a long time since I sewed anything. Prior to contracting COVID in January, I sewed up a heap of shirts (yet to be blogged). But post-COVID, with Long COVID seriously affecting my health, I knew sewing was just too much for me.

Siobhan, a white Disabled woman in her 30s, stands in her lounge room leaning on a hot pink cane. She wears a bold yellow, brown, black and white 70s style floral print button up shirt with grandpa collar, and slim fit black ponte pants.

I decided to test this theory by making a shirt from some fabric I had lying around. Well, my test proved my suspicions – I crashed hard and my body had an allergic reaction (!) to the process. Anyway. Here’s the shirt.

Siobhan, a white Disabled woman in her 30s, sits on a lounge, wearing a bold yellow, brown, black and white 70s style floral print button up shirt with grandpa collar, and slim fit black ponte pants.

This is an Elbe Textiles Cornell Shirt, an oversized button up shirt with grandpa collar and dropped sleeves. My friend Naomi gifted me the pattern, knowing that it was just my style. I sewed it up in what I think is a cotton barkcloth (fabric identification is not my forte) from the op shop.

It was a narrow piece with a large square cut from the meterage, and generously donated along with the remainder of the fabric. This meant some pattern tetris was needed to fit the shirt on the fabric. I pieced the collar and yoke facings, and cut the collar and yoke shell on the lengthwise grain.

Siobhan, a white Disabled woman in her 30s, stands in her lounge room leaning on a hot pink cane. She wears a bold yellow, brown, black and white 70s style floral print button up shirt with grandpa collar, and slim fit black ponte pants. Her back is to the camera, showing the hanging loop and generous pleat in the back of the shirt.
How good is that hanging loop. I omitted it on my first Cornell, and I regret it.

Otherwise, I made no more adjustments than my usual forward head adjustment. This pattern really just works as is.

Siobhan, a white Disabled woman in her 30s, stands in her lounge room leaning on a hot pink cane. She wears a bold yellow, brown, black and white 70s style floral print button up shirt with grandpa collar, and slim fit black ponte pants. Her side is to the camera, showing the curved hemline of the shirt, which lifts at the front due to its generous and shapeless fit.

 

I adore this shirt and have been wearing it as much as washing allows since making it. I actually have two previously sewn Cornells that are a more summer weight fabric, and I plan to make more. They’re just that good.

A close up of Siobhan and the collar stand with topstitching, and button band with tortoiseshell buttons.
Grandpa collar and some lovely tortoiseshell buttons I found in my button box

 

I have two little quibbles which you might be able to help me with: firstly, this fabric is absolutely not dye fast. I’m glad I realised this when I washed it alone to remove the washaway stabiliser and fabric marker, before putting it in with all my white towels. I’ve been washing it separately with a dye catcher which always comes out black, but I want to set the dye. How would you go about this? I think I’ve used Retayne in the past, but it’s expensive and hard to find in Aus.

Secondly: this shirt used up the last of my precious SheerWeft interfacing. I’m not kidding when I say I use this stuff in all of my projects. It’s just the right weight to not interfere with any fabric drape, but gives a little stability to collars, cuffs etc. Tragically, it’s been discontinued! What’s your favourite lightweight interfacing? If it helps, I think SheerWeft is known as Palmer/Pletsch Sheer in the US.

A close up on Siobhan who smugly smiles as she shows her tower sleeve placket.
I do love a simple tower placket. You can read more about how I sew plackets and other shirt accruements in my post, What I talk about when I talk about shirtmaking.

 

The pants are the Style Arc Brooklyn Knit Pant, in a ponte from MaaiDesign. I added 5cm length to the leg and I think did my own elastic insertion method, the usual “pyjama” feed through with a big safety pin for an adjustable fit, then topstitched it to stop any rolling. I also topstitched the pockets to the leg front so they don’t flap around.

There isn’t much to say as Style Arc patterns are typically well drafted and easy to wear, with a RTW look. They go with everything and are very comfy to wear.

Siobhan, a white Disabled woman in her 30s, stands in her lounge room leaning on a hot pink cane. She wears a bold yellow, brown, black and white 70s style floral print button up shirt with grandpa collar, and slim fit black ponte pants.

 

The details:
Pattern: Elbe Textiles Cornell Shirt
Pattern details: “The Cornell Shirt is a casual, oversized design featuring drop shoulders and a grandpa collar. View A has a button up placket at the front, extending down past the waist, and View B has a classic button stand at the front. The insides are finished cleanly with a mix of French seams and facings.” Sizes AA-L (chest 82-142cm/32-56″).
Fabric: 2.4 x 115cm wide barkcloth (?) fabric – has had a 56cm square piece cut out and preserved. Large scale retro print. $1 from Salvos.
Other materials: Sheerweft interfacing. 10mm tortoiseshell buttons.
Mods: Size E, view B
– 1/2″ forward head adjustment at yoke and front, same to sleeve, lowered front neck a little (to next size) to compensate
– Omitted collar stand button

The details:
Pattern: Style Arc Brooklyn Knit Pant
Pattern details: “Opt for a luxe track pant style for a relaxed weekend. Knit pants have become a fashion favourite guaranteeing a warm casual day time look that’s both versatile and chic. The forward side seam creates a slimming silhouette along with the angles pockets.” Sizes AU 4-30 (hip 32.6-61″ / 83-154cm).
Fabric: 2m x 148cm wide ponte, black, from MaaiDesign. 67% viscose, 28% nylon, 5% spandex. 340gsm (heavy weight). Medium drape, 30% stretch cross grain and lengthwise.
Other materials: Knit elastic, from Spotlight.
Mods: Size 16
– Added 5cm length to leg at lengthen/shorten line
– Took out 1cm each leg piece (4cm total, 4cm taken from waistband) as I was in between a size 14 and 16

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Author: Siobhan S

30 something, living in country Australia. Spoonie profile: ME/CFS, dysautonomia, anxiety. All about sewing, knitting and food. Unapologetic disability advocate.

2 thoughts on “Elbe Textiles Cornell Shirt and Style Arc Brooklyn Knit Pants”

  1. Hi -Oh its great to see you sewing again. I believe washing your shirt with salt will top the bleeding but I can’t remember how much. I think its a couple of cups.
    Have you tried Amazon for your SheerWeft? I had some luck getting some machine embroidery supplies. Could be worth a look.

    Liked by 1 person

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