Vale Ann-Marie Smith

CW: neglect, death, possible manslaughter of a disabled person

A white woman with abundant curly blonde hair and a smile on her face.
Ann-Marie Smith. Source.

Ann-Marie Smith was a 54-year-old woman with Cerebral Palsy. She lived alone in Adelaide, South Australia. And on 6 April 2020, Ann-Marie died from severe septic shock, multi-organ failure, severe pressure sores and malnutrition.

Continue reading “Vale Ann-Marie Smith”

Article published on Independent Australia: Horse racing kicks sand in the face of Levy’s Beach

Hi folks! I’m pleased to announce that after a long hiatus, I’ve had another article published on Independent Australia: “Horse racing kicks sand in the face of Levy’s Beach”. Continue reading “Article published on Independent Australia: Horse racing kicks sand in the face of Levy’s Beach”

So I watched Unrest

Omar Wasow carries his wife Jennifer Brea in a scene from Unrest.
There are many promotional stills from Unrest, but this gives me the most hope.

If you’ve been involved at all with the ME/CFS community, you will be well aware of the significance of the release of Unrest, the independent documentary by debut filmmaker Jennifer Brea about the illness. If not, it’s hard to overstate the important of this film for people with ME/CFS. Ours is a story that is not told in the mainstream media, or one that is so poorly represented that it usually makes a mockery of our lives. Continue reading “So I watched Unrest”

Article published on Independent Australia

Just a heads up that I’ve had another piece published, regarding racism in the AFL. You might recall I wrote about footballer Adam Goodes earlier in the year – how his unapologetic stance against outrageous racism from fans and players cost him his position in the AFL. Another player, Héritier Lumumba, has recently had his career cut short by similar racial abuse. The fact that he stood up against racial slurs, sexism and homophobia in the sport made him a prime target for those who believe minority groups should be seen and not heard.

Read Héritier Lumumba and the AFL’s problem with race on Independent Australia.

Refer to caption.
Héritier Lumumba.

An undemocratic postal survey

Last week, I received my voting form for the Australian Marriage Law survey. Thanks to the political will of the Coalition Federal Government, Australians now have the opportunity to cast their potentially meaningless vote on the legalisation of same-sex marriage via an unnecessary and divisive postal survey. Costing $122 million, the survey is non-binding*, and several Liberal MPs, including almost half of South Australian representatives, have already claimed they will not acknowledge a “yes” vote.

Character from The Simpsons looks at bill. Text readsL (sigh) 122 million dollar-adoos?

Legally, a survey or plebiscite is not necessary to make any amendments to the Marriage Act, which the Howard government changed in 2004 to define marriage as “the union of a man and a woman to the exclusion of all others”, and to prevent same-sex marriages conducted overseas being recognised in Australia.** Continue reading “An undemocratic postal survey”

Writing published elsewhere

Recently I was lucky enough to have two pieces of my writing published. The first was for a popular Australian lifestyle website, Mamamia, entitled, “Seven things you probably don’t know about chronic fatigue syndrome.” I was very grateful for the opportunity to share my experience of ME/CFS with a wider audience, and it was well-received within the Aussie ME/CFS community.

The second was another political piece for Independent Australia, “What the ‘female’ traffic light response reveals about how society views women.” The city of Melbourne recently decided to replace a few traffic light symbols with figures wearing dresses, and chaos outrage vitriol ensued. This article is my take on how we view the “feminine” in public spaces.

Story published on The Mighty – A Grief That Never Ends

Hi folks! Just an update that I’ve had another story published on The Mighty. It is about the continual process of grieving through chronic illness, and how so few people can really cope with others’ grief.

You can read more on: The Ongoing Process of Grief When You Have a Chronic Illness.

Pieces published on xoJane and Independent Australia

I find I enjoy writing so much that I’ve been working hard on submissions for other publications. Recently I had two pieces published, of which I am immensely proud.

Continue reading “Pieces published on xoJane and Independent Australia”

Top 5 of 2016

Every year, Gillian of Crafting a Rainbow hosts a Top 5 of 2016 round-up, whereby members of the online sewing community share their top 5 hits, misses, highlights, reflections and goals. I haven’t been blogging long enough to do a full post on each category, so today I’ll share one from each. Continue reading “Top 5 of 2016”

Op ed published in The Standard

Hi folks! Just a short note to say I had an opinion piece published in my local paper about disability access in Warrnambool. The state of shop access and disabled parking bays in town is abysmal, yet with council elections coming up, no candidate has made disability advocacy a priority. I want that to change.

A clip from a local newspaper's website. Headline reads: Warrnambool's Siobhan Simper calls for better disabled access in the CBD. There is a photo of a young woman in the main street with her hands on her hips. Caption reads:

Continue reading “Op ed published in The Standard”